New security rules on electronic devices cause confusion and delays at airports in UK

Passengers going abroad for their summer holidays face extra security checks at airport departure gates . Following an alert about a terrorist plot to plant explosives in consumer electronics such as mobile phones, tablet computers or laptops, the Department for Transport this week warned all international passengers: “Make sure your electronic devices are charged before you travel. If your device doesn’t switch on when requested, you won’t be allowed to bring it onto the aircraft.” The DfT specifies that all flights to and from the UK could be affected. Most passengers will not be asked to switch on their devices .
The confusion seems to apply to airports who have taken different approaches to notifying passengers and implementing the extra checks .
The Edinburgh Airport website makes no reference to the new rules, saying only: “Passengers travelling to the United States should expect their airline to carry out additional security checks prior to boarding.” A spokesperson for Edinburgh Airport said: “Security staff continue to maintain high levels of vigilance at all times and ensure that current security measures are implemented fully and conscientiously. These include screening and checking electronic devices.”

Some easyJet and British Airways passengers from Gatwick faced delays on the first wave of flights. For both airlines, four out of the first 10 departures from Gatwick this morning were delayed by up to an hour, including flights to Venice, Bordeaux and Nice.

Departures from the UK’s other three big airports – Heathrow, Stansted and Manchester – were operating normally. However, BA passengers from Baltimore arrived 20 hours late and last night’s Frankfurt-Heathrow arrival is now scheduled for this afternoon.

Eurocontrol in Brussels warned of “moderate to high delays” for flights to the Greek islands of Crete, Mykonos, Santorini and Skiathos because of a lack of capacity. There were also airspace restrictions in western France and Cyprus.

Edinburgh Airport reports increase in passenger numbers for May

Edinburgh Airport has consolidated its position as the busiest airport in Scotland with its report of a 3.5 per cent increase in May passenger numbers. The airport entrance can get quite congested from about six in the morning because of passengers arriving for early morning flights . A transfer to Edinburgh Airport from Falkirk takes about half an hour. Phone 07576-127097 for transfer bookings.

The airport, owned by Global Infrastructure Partners, said a total of 937,093 passengers passed through its terminals last month.

International passenger numbers are reported to have risen 5.7 per cent year-on-year to 517,543 in total, which the airport said was down to the launch of a number of new routes.

New routes launched in May included three new long-haul destinations linking Edinburgh Airport with Chicago and Philadelphia in the US and Doha in Qatar.

The airport said domestic passenger numbers rose by 0.9 per cent in May from to 419,550 in total.

Chief executive Gordon Dewar said May was “a tremendous month” the airport.

“We enjoyed two of our most successful weeks ever when we launched four international airline routes, something which we’ve never experienced before,” he said.

“We worked hard with our city partners to deliver Edinburgh’s first Middle Eastern route and we’re looking forward to a successful partnership with Qatar Airways who are operating Scotland’s first scheduled Dreamliner.

“The success of these new routes will enhance our global connectivity and ensure we continue to provide our passengers with the best choice possible.

“With the school summer holidays just around the corner, coupled with the Ryder Cup and Edinburgh Festival, we’re looking forward to welcoming many thousands of passengers through our airport over the coming weeks.”

A transfer to Edinburgh Airport from Falkirk takes about half an hour. Phone 07576-127097 for transfer bookings

Edinburgh Airport flies the flight fantastic

Edinburgh Airport has stunned visitors by lighting the control tower  in violet ahead of a rebranding.

Airport chiefs have stated the colour change could be a glimpse into  the rebrand which is  revealed to the public today at Edinburgh Castle.

“We changed the colour on the tower as a little teaser for the public, and also because it’s coming up to Christmas,” said airport spokesman Gordon Robertson.

“We wanted to build up anticipation and excitement about the changes that are being made. The rebrand is needed, we’ve been working very hard in the six months since it was purchased by new owners and we’re all very excited.”

The airport was bought by GIP in the summer and numerous improvements have been made since then. The car park has been totally resurfaced. The controversial drop-off charge of £1 is still in place causing compaints from Airport shuttle companoes in Falkirk. Critics have said that it is a blatant ripoff to charge customers for using the airport. There is no sign of the airport chiefs changing their mind about the charge.

The airport was sold in April to Global Infrastructure Partners, after the Competition Commission ruled BAA had to sell either Edinburgh or Glasgow.

Former managing director of Edinburgh Airport, Gordon Dewar, has been appointed chief executive officer. Mr Dewar is currently CEO of Bahrain International Airport and will rejoin the team at Edinburgh in the summer.

The airport’s current managing director, Jim O’Sullivan, has agreed to continue in his role until then. Edinburgh Airport refused to say what post Mr O’Sullivan was moving to.

Competitive player Michael McGhee, Global Infrastructure Partners partner, said: “Gordon is an outstanding airport executive, with relevant experience of Edinburgh Airport. “We are pleased to have secured his return and look forward to supporting him and his team as they begin the important job of establishing Edinburgh Airport as a more dynamic, competitive player in the global aviation industry.”

He added: “It is important to acknowledge the important role played by current airport managing director, Jim O’Sullivan, who has steered his team through the sale process with the highest levels of professionalism and focus.

“He will leave Edinburgh Airport in good shape, and with our best wishes.”

Gordon Dewar, who was managing director of Edinburgh Airport between 2008 and 2010, said: “Edinburgh is my home city, and I am excited to be returning to one of the most important jobs in the capital. The challenge of leading the airport and the team into a new era of competition and growth is an irresistible one, and very different to the role I once played in BAA. “Edinburgh Airport’s future, its plans and its identity, will all be shaped in Edinburgh, and our decisions will only be influenced by what is good for Edinburgh Airport, and the city and country we serve.”

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